Dental Tourism


Dental Tourism In India

India, especially Tamilnadu is one of the top dental tourist destinations. Dental tourism forms 10 percent of the total Indian medical tourism which is projected to grow at 30 percent to Rs 9500 crore by 2015. Soorya Dental Care enables both national and international patients to save on dental treatments while exploring Tamilnadu. Soorya Dental Care is the best destination to save without compromising on quality. So come let us redesign the way you smile without compromising on quality and save up to 80% on your dental treatments. Soorya Dental Care is located in the heritage capital of Tamilnadu, Karaikudi. This tourist destination is well known for its architectural beauties, clan temples, handicrafts, and artecrafts. The amazing architectures in the heritage buildings are a treat to watch.

Sittanavasal


It is a Jain monastery of the 7th century, small in size, excavated in a bluff on the western slope of the hill in its centre. The painting themes depict a beautiful lotus pond and flowers, people collecting lotuses from the pond, two dancing figures, lilies, fish, geese, buffaloes and elephants. Mulk Raj Anand said of the paintings, “Pallava craftsmen used greens and browns, with a genuine ability and a lyrical flow of line. Lotuses spring up from imaginary ponds amid variegated greenery, under a bluish sheen. In addition, inscriptions of the 9th and 10th century are also seen. The exquisite ceiling of the Ardhamandapam is decorated with murals from the 7th century. The cave temple has placid pillars and sculptures of Jain Tirthankaras. However, most of the frescoes which were covered fully in plaster have been severely defaced or not clearly visible due to inadequate security and maintenance resulting in vandalism in the past five or six decades. Originally, the entire cave temple, including the sculptures, was covered with plaster and painted. The paintings are on the theme of Jaina Samavasarana, the “most attractive heavenly pavilion”, referring to the attainment of Nirvana and Khatika bhumi. One states that this is a distorted version of “chir-ran-nal-vaa-yil” meaning in Tamil language “the abode of great saints”. Another states that this was a suburb of Annalvayil

Pillayarpatti


It is a Jain monastery of the 7th century, small in size, excavated in a bluff on the western slope of the hill in its centre. The painting themes depict a beautiful lotus pond and flowers, people collecting lotuses from the pond, two dancing figures, lilies, fish, geese, buffaloes and elephants. Mulk Raj Anand said of the paintings, “Pallava craftsmen used greens and browns, with a genuine ability and a lyrical flow of line. Lotuses spring up from imaginary ponds amid variegated greenery, under a bluish sheen. In addition, inscriptions of the 9th and 10th century are also seen. The exquisite ceiling of the Ardhamandapam is decorated with murals from the 7th century. The cave temple has placid pillars and sculptures of Jain Tirthankaras. However, most of the frescoes which were covered fully in plaster have been severely defaced or not clearly visible due to inadequate security and maintenance resulting in vandalism in the past five or six decades. Originally, the entire cave temple, including the sculptures, was covered with plaster and painted. The paintings are on the theme of Jaina Samavasarana, the “most attractive heavenly pavilion”, referring to the attainment of Nirvana and Khatika bhumi. One states that this is a distorted version of “chir-ran-nal-vaa-yil” meaning in Tamil language “the abode of great saints”. Another states that this was a suburb of Annalvayil

Kundrakudi


It is a Jain monastery of the 7th century, small in size, excavated in a bluff on the western slope of the hill in its centre. The painting themes depict a beautiful lotus pond and flowers, people collecting lotuses from the pond, two dancing figures, lilies, fish, geese, buffaloes and elephants. Mulk Raj Anand said of the paintings, “Pallava craftsmen used greens and browns, with a genuine ability and a lyrical flow of line. Lotuses spring up from imaginary ponds amid variegated greenery, under a bluish sheen. In addition, inscriptions of the 9th and 10th century are also seen. The exquisite ceiling of the Ardhamandapam is decorated with murals from the 7th century. The cave temple has placid pillars and sculptures of Jain Tirthankaras. However, most of the frescoes which were covered fully in plaster have been severely defaced or not clearly visible due to inadequate security and maintenance resulting in vandalism in the past five or six decades. Originally, the entire cave temple, including the sculptures, was covered with plaster and painted. The paintings are on the theme of Jaina Samavasarana, the “most attractive heavenly pavilion”, referring to the attainment of Nirvana and Khatika bhumi. One states that this is a distorted version of “chir-ran-nal-vaa-yil” meaning in Tamil language “the abode of great saints”. Another states that this was a suburb of Annalvayil